Susan Warner Keene

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    Susan Warner Keene artwork

    Susan Warner Keene

    Precio habitual $2,500.00
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    Visible  Hemispheres #11

    Handmade paper (abaca, linen thread),  27.5 x 27.5 x 1.5 in / 70 x 70 x 4 cm, unframed.

    The title for the Visible Hemispheres series was suggested by an old engraving
    that depicts the known lunar surface, identifying the meridian of contact between
    the visible and invisible hemispheres of the moon. But the printed image can only
    portray the face that is illuminated. The other half of this familiar sphere remains
    a mystery. Still, the visible hemisphere speaks to our imagination, encouraging
    us to reach beyond immediate physical circumstance, to expand our thinking to
    include that other, shadow twin.

     

    Carrito

    Susan Warner Keene is a Toronto-based artist working in handmade paper who has been exhibiting in Canada and internationally since 1980. Her work is in the collection of the Canadian Museum of History and the Canadian Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade, and Development, as well as many other public, corporate, and private collections. Keene has been active as an educator, writer, editor, curator and volunteer with such organizations as the School of Craft & Design of Sheridan College, Oakville, the Ontario Crafts Council (now Craft Ontario) and the Textile Museum of Canada. Her work has been supported by grants from the Ontario Arts Council and the Canada Council for the Arts, and in 1991 she was presented with the Prix Saidye Bronfman Award for Excellence in the Crafts (a Governor General’s Award in Visual and Media Arts). She was elected to the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts in 2005.

    My usual material is high-shrinkage abaca and flax fiber pulps, partly because of
    their capacity for mark-making and three-dimensionality, partly because of the
    delicate, skin-like quality of the papers they make, so reminiscent of our own
    bodies. At the same time, I am constantly aware of the historical significance of
    paper in the transmission of knowledge and culture. This dual personality of
    paper, comprising the cultural and the visceral, makes it seem very human to me.
    The physical labor of transforming plant fiber into a sheet of paper is a
    collaborative process with the material. Although the making of paper pulp
    appears to be a simple one, it offers surprisingly varied possibilities for image
    making. For me, the ability to build an image while the sheet of paper itself is
    formed has kept my attention for many years. Focused attention is essential, with
    all the senses attuned to what is happening from moment to moment, as pulp
    becomes paper. It is a slow, but deeply engrossing, practice.

     

    Susan Warner Keene is a Toronto-based artist working in handmade paper who has been exhibiting in Canada and internationally since 1980. Her work is in the collection of the Canadian Museum of History and the Canadian Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade, and Development, as well as many other public, corporate, and private collections. Keene has been active as an educator, writer, editor, curator and volunteer with such organizations as the School of Craft & Design of Sheridan College, Oakville, the Ontario Crafts Council (now Craft Ontario) and the Textile Museum of Canada. Her work has been supported by grants from the Ontario Arts Council and the Canada Council for the Arts, and in 1991 she was presented with the Prix Saidye Bronfman Award for Excellence in the Crafts (a Governor General’s Award in Visual and Media Arts). She was elected to the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts in 2005.