Barry Ace

Color
    Francis Densmore and Maheengun (Little Wolf) (2020) mixed media on paper 23 x 9.5 cm, unframed.

    Barry Ace

    Regular price $450.00
    /

    Francis Densmore and Maheengun (Little Wolf) (2020) mixed media on paper 23 x 9.5 cm, unframed.

    Frances Theresa Densmore (1867 – 1957) was an American anthropologist and ethnographer who was known for her studies of Native american music and culture. 

    Click here for more work by this artist.

    Cart
    Bagonegiizhig (Hole in the Day) (2020) mixed media on paper 18 x 13 cm, unframed.

    Barry Ace

    Regular price $450.00
    /

    Bagonegiizhig (Hole in the Day) (2020) mixed media on paper 18 x 13 cm, unframed.

    Bagonegiizhig was head chief of the Mississippi Band of the Ojibwe (Chippewa) of central Minnesota. Like his father, Hole in the Day the Younger was prominent in skirmishes against the Sioux (Dakota) as well as in negotiations with the Dakota and with the U.S. government. Hole in the Day the Younger strove to be considered the head chief of all Minnesota Ojibwe.

    Click here for more work by this artist.

    Cart
    Tekahionwake (Pauline E. Johnson) x 3 Views (2020) mixed media on paper 18 x 13 cm.

    Barry Ace

    Regular price $450.00
    /

    Tekahionwake (Pauline E. Johnson) 3 Views (2020) mixed media on paper 18 x 13 cm, unframed.

    Emily Pauline Johnson (1861–1913), also known by her Mohawk stage name Tekahionwake ("Double-Life") was popular in the late 19th and early 20th centuries as a poet, author, and performer. 

    Click here for more work by this artist.

    Cart
    Nahgunegahbow (Standing Forward) (2020) mixed media on paper 23 x 9.5 cm, unframed.

    Barry Ace

    Regular price $450.00
    /

    Nahgunegahbow (Standing Forward) (2020) mixed media on paper, 23 x 9.5 cm, unframed.

    The Hudson’s Bay trade blankets carry with them a long narrative of colonization and trade history with the peoples of the Great Lakes, but also carry with them culture specific signs and semiotics as the blankets became assimilated into Anishinaabeg material culture. The trade blankets were at one time revered and were offered as highly valued gifts and were worn as regalia on important occasions and even fashioned into garments such as coats. When these blankets were decorated with a beaded blanket strip, for instance, they took on and even greater cultural and spiritual significance. An early photograph taken by Charles A. Zimmerman (circa 1872 and 1890) and sourced from the Smithsonian Institute of Nahgunegahbow or Mahjegahbo (Standing Forward or He Looks Well Standing Forward) wearing such a blanket and blanket strip is a fine example.

    Click here for more work by this artist.

    Cart
    Tekahionwake (Pauline E. Johnson) (2020) mixed media on paper 18 x 13 cm.

    Barry Ace

    Regular price $450.00
    /

    Tekahionwake (Pauline E. Johnson) (2020) mixed media on paper 18 x 13 cm, unframed.

    Emily Pauline Johnson (1861–1913), also known by her Mohawk stage name Tekahionwake ("Double-Life") was popular in the late 19th and early 20th centuries as a poet, author, and performer. 

    Click here for more work by this artist.

    Cart
    Micro-Chip and Nahgunegahbow (Standing Forward) (2020) mixed media on paper 18 x 13 cm.

    Barry Ace

    Regular price $450.00
    /

    Micro-Chip and Nahgunegahbow (Standing Forward) (2020) mixed media on paper 18 x 13 cm,, unframed.

    The Hudson’s Bay trade blankets carry with them a long narrative of colonization and trade history with the peoples of the Great Lakes, but also carry with them culture specific signs and semiotics as the blankets became assimilated into Anishinaabeg material culture. The trade blankets were at one time revered and were offered as highly valued gifts and were worn as regalia on important occasions and even fashioned into garments such as coats. When these blankets were decorated with a beaded blanket strip, for instance, they took on and even greater cultural and spiritual significance. An early photograph taken by Charles A. Zimmerman (circa 1872 and 1890) and sourced from the Smithsonian Institute of Nahgunegahbow or Mahjegahbo (Standing Forward or He Looks Well Standing Forward) wearing such a blanket and blanket strip is a fine example.

    Click here for more work by this artist.

    Cart
    Barry Ace

    Barry Ace

    Regular price $1,200.00
    /

     

    Bnesi (Thunderbird) Bling (2020) mixed media.
    54 (1) x 18 (w) cm
     

    Click here for more work by this artist.

    Cart
    Barry Ace
    Barry Ace
    Barry Ace

    Barry Ace

    Regular price $2,200.00
    /

     

    Bnesi (Thunderbird) and Mishibijw (Water Panther) (2020) digital output on archival canvas, glass beads, thread, hide, metal, wood. The photographs and taken on Manitoulin Island. The birch bard refences Anishinaabe scrolls and the Thunderbird is a sacred bird symbolizing protection. The Mishibijiw (Water Panther) is a water being who controls water - the waves are visible on its back. 
    This work is available as a diptych or as individual works. 
    Diptych dimensions: 81 x 38 cm.


    As individual works:

    Bnesi (Thunderbird) (2020) digital output on archival canvas, glass beads, thread, hide, metal, wood. 41 x 19 cm 


    Mishibijw (Water Panther) (2020) digital output on archival canvas, glass beads, thread, hide, metal, wood. 41 x 19 cm 

     

    Click here for more work by this artist.

    Cart
    Migration Scroll, 2018 based on the Anishinaabe birch bark scrolls, but upcycled to a digital technological tableaux.  Mixed media, 8 × 20 × 5 in

    Barry Ace

    Regular price $2,500.00
    /

     Migration Scroll, 2018 based on the Anishinaabe birch bark scrolls, but upcycled to a digital technological tableaux.  Mixed media, 8 × 20 × 5 in

     Click here for more work by this artist.

    Cart
    Barry Ace
    Barry Ace

    Barry Ace

    Regular price $2,400.00
    /

     

    Kitchi Zibi Omàmìwininì Anishinàbe

    Digital print on rag paper

    This photograph was taken by Ace in 2013 of the controversial Hamilton MacCarthy sculpture of the Indigenous scout that was relocated to Major's Hill Park from its original location as part of the Champlain Monument situated on Nepean Point directly behind the National Gallery of Canada. In the background is Iluliaq (Iceberg) by Greenlandic artist Inuk Silis Høegh looming in the background, and it is artfully framed by Ottawa's Central Art Garage. 

    21 × 34 in
    Editions 1, 2 of 2

    Click here for more work by this artist.

    Cart
    Buffalo, mixed media small scale collage-based artwork with computer part beading 2019.   As our digital age exponentially transforms and infuses Anishinaabeg culture (and other global cultures) with new technologies and new ways of communicating, we are harnessing and bridging the precipice between historical and contemporary knowledge, art and power, while maintaining a distinct Anishinaabeg aesthetic connecting generations. Barry Ace

    Barry Ace

    Regular price $450.00
    /

    Buffalo, mixed media small scale collage-based artwork with computer part beading 2019. 

    As our digital age exponentially transforms and infuses Anishinaabeg culture (and other global cultures) with new technologies and new ways of communicating, we are harnessing and bridging the precipice between historical and contemporary knowledge, art and power, while maintaining a distinct Anishinaabeg aesthetic connecting generations. Barry Ace

    Click here for more work by this artist.

    Cart
    Untitled, unknown portrait from the Smithsonian Museum.  As our digital age exponentially transforms and infuses Anishinaabeg culture (and other global cultures) with new technologies and new ways of communicating, we are harnessing and bridging the precipice between historical and contemporary knowledge, art and power, while maintaining a distinct Anishinaabeg aesthetic connecting generations. Barry Ace

    Barry Ace

    Regular price $450.00
    /

     Untitled, unknown portrait from the Smithsonian Museum.

    As our digital age exponentially transforms and infuses Anishinaabeg culture (and other global cultures) with new technologies and new ways of communicating, we are harnessing and bridging the precipice between historical and contemporary knowledge, art and power, while maintaining a distinct Anishinaabeg aesthetic connecting generations. Barry Ace

    Click here for more work by this artist.

    Cart
    Barry Ace

    Barry Ace

    Regular price $1,200.00
    /

    Thunderbird and Shaman (2020), Epson Archival Canvas, beads, wood, metal, thread, hide, approx. 12 x 13".

    From the artist's Memory Landscape diptych series.  The Thunderbird is beaded above a pictograph of a Shaman figure from Lake Matagamasi located in the Sudbury District.  Ace took the photograph in the 1980s while on a canoe trip through the lake.

    The work is printed on archival Epson Canvas with a simulated birch bark background added via Photoshop from a scan of real birchbark. The work references Anishinaabe birchbark scrolls that are etched iconography stitched together with spruce root.

    Click here for more work by this artist.

    Cart
    Barry Ace's first Doublebling neckpiece
    Barry Ace
    Barry Ace

    Barry Ace

    Regular price $1,350.00
    /

    Double-Sided Digital Bling (2020). This double-sided neckpiece is a first for the artist.  

    One side of the medallion has a Great Lakes' style floral motif composed of hand-stitched glass beads or manidoominens which in Anishinaabemowin translates to "little energy or spirt berries". The flip side incorporates electronic components that are assembled on a circular circuit board into a floral motif. Like the glass beads, electronic components control, store and release energy, so there is a powerful simile between these two disparate entities. The wearer can choose to wear the traditional floral beaded medallion, or reverse it to wear the electronic component contemporary floral motif - a confluence between the historical and contemporary.

    Rope, glass beads, antique white-heart beads, deer hide, beading thread, circuit-board, capacitors, resistors, light-emitting diodes, tin jingle cones, copper wire, horse hair, synthetic hair, rhinestones, 56 x 15 cm. 

    Click here for more work by this artist.

    Cart
    Barry Ace

    Barry Ace

    Regular price $3,000.00
    /

    Poignant (2018) found antique wooden and iron flax Hetchel comb, bronze screen, electronic components (capacitors, resistors, light emitting diodes), glass beads, bronze screen, circuit board, coated wired  

    49 (L) x 15 (H) x 11 (W) 

    This work addresses the impact of Residential Schools on First Nations in Canada, including Ace's family. A single wire moccasin is held empty denoting the stripping of culture and language, and the floral work on one side of the moccasin denotes some knowledge survived. The wire fringe represents the hide trail dusters that were affixed to moccasins to erase the wear's tracks. The single moccasin is positioned on top of a needle sharp Hetchel instrument designed for shredding.

    Click here for more work by this artist.

    Cart

    Barry Ace is a practicing visual artist and currently lives in Ottawa, Canada. He is a band member of M’Chigeeng First Nation, Odawa Mnis (Manitoulin Island), Ontario, Canada. His mixed media paintings and assemblage textile works explore various aspects of cultural continuity and the confluence of the historical and contemporary.

    Barry Ace's textile practice draws its inspiration from historical Anishinaabeg arts of the Great Lakes that incorporate floral and geometric beadwork motifs. Ace up-cycles reclaimed and salvaged electronic components and circuitry (capacitors and resistors) transforming the refuse of the technological age into complex floral motifs. In doing so, Ace references Anishinaabeg beadwork as a metaphor for cultural continuity, bridging the past with the present and the future, and as a demonstrable act of nationhood, resistance and modernity. His contemporary practice intentionally, yet respectfully, transcends and moves forward conventional Anishinaabeg cultural boundaries as a confluence between the historical and contemporary.

    PINNGUAQ FEATURES ACE’S WORK IN THEIR PRINT AND ONLINE MAGAZINE “ROOT AND STEM”

    The Ottawa Art Gallery Interview Barry Ace